Camila Morrone Defends Her Nearly 23-Year Age Gap With Leonardo DiCaprio



Blocking out the haters. Camila Morrone has no time for anyone’s criticism about the nearly 23-year age gap between her and boyfriend Leonardo DiCaprio.

In an interview with the Los Angeles Times on Tuesday, December 3, the 22-year-old actress and model admitted that while she understands why people are so interested in her relationship, she doesn’t let the negativity get her down.

“There’s so many relationships in Hollywood — and in the history of the world — where people have large age gaps,” Morrone said candidly. “I just think anyone should be able to date who they want to date.”

Camila Morrone and Leonardo DiCaprio. John Salangsang/Variety/Shutterstock; Charles Sykes/Invision/AP/Shutterstock

Us Weekly confirmed that the Argentinian-American was casually seeing the Great Gatsby star, 45, in December 2017. However, their no-strings fling quickly turned into a steady romance. A source close to the pair told Us in November 2018 that the movie stars were “very serious” about each other. “Everyone is saying that marriage could be soon for them,” the insider added at the time.

Since making their relationship official, Morrone has faced waves of scrutiny from outsiders about her dating an older man. In October, the Never Goin’ Back actress responded to a viral meme about her relationship with DiCaprio that joked, “You either die a hero or you live long enough to become an Instagram boyfriend.”

Morrone kept her retort lighthearted, telling Vanity Fair at the time that the Oscar winner defies the Instagram boyfriend label. “Poor thing,” she teased. “He’s an environmentalist and a movie star, and it doesn’t mean a thing!”

Despite her relationship with the A-lister being placed under a microscope, the Mickey and the Bear star is hopeful that she’ll someday be able to make a name for herself without always being mentioned alongside her famous partner.

“I think more and more now that people are seeing the film, I’m slowly getting an identity outside of that,” Morrone told the Los Angeles Times. “Which is frustrating because I feel like there should always be an identity besides who you’re dating … I understand the association, but I’m confident that will continue to slip away and be less of a conversation.”



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